LED Lighting Part Deux: Puck Lights -a cheaper option?

By Kyle May
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Kyle May
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Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:43 pm
Location: NothEast Ohio, USA

LED Lighting Part Deux: Puck Lights -a cheaper option?

Post by Kyle May » Sun Feb 10, 2013 9:03 pm

Cruising Lowe's Home Improvement store today I found LED Puck lights.
If you read the previous post, you saw my article on how
to change your current energy wasting strip lights to energy efficient LED lights.
I won't go into the how's and why's here, (go read the previous post for that), but for a moderate initial investment
you can save a ton of money in the long run by switching over to led lights.

In that article you were introduced to a 5 led light fixture that uses 7 watts.
While it will provide enough light for the standard 75 - 90 gallon 4' long tank, it also
costs about $55 for the fixture. The strength of that light is a series of 5- 1.5 watt LED lights spaced out
over the length of the fixture and this is a good thing for longer tanks. Still $55 can seem a lot of money to upgrade
an old strip light. Of course over the next couple of years this price will drop dramatically,
but for now it's about the cheapest fixture I'd found until today. As I mentioned before I found LED Puck lights
while cruising Lowe's this afternoon. The big deal here is that the puck lights come three to a pack for $25.
Here's a pic one of the puck lights:

Image

This puck light has 6 leds behind a fresnel lens. These leds are supposed to use .5 watts each for a total of
3 watts, but in testing the puck light actually used 5 watts. I didn't do a long test on the fixture so it's possible that
after running for a longer period of time the consumption would decrease. Still, 5 watts is a tiny amount of power
considering that one of these puck lights completely lit a 36" x 18" 40 gallon breeder. Here's a pic of one puck light on a 40.
This tank is on a system by the way, so it is totally full of water in this pic but do pardon the dirty glass please:

Image

I don't even have the puck in a fixture or centered on the tank and it's nicely lighting the aquarium. Sure there's
a tiny bit of light falloff in the corners, but I have long despised the flat lighting of florescent tubes.
I have 4 40 gallon breeders and all but one of them are currently lit by a 13 watt compact florescent bulb.
The puck light uses almost 2/3rds less juice than the energy miser compact florescent! By the way,
if you look at the instructions on the run of the mill compact florescent bulb, it'll tell you not to use
this type of bulb in humid areas..so the fish room probably is a bad choice for the compact anyway.

Consider this. I tested a light strip on a 20 gallon high aquarium recently. This was the type that had a starter.
This 24 inch light strip was using 53 watts. Just one puck light will light a 20 gallon tank like high
noon on a Tuesday in June....all while saving over 90% of the previous energy hogging strip light.
So now you can light tanks up to 40 gallon breeders with a single 5 watt puck light that will set you
back just over $8 each US, (3 puck lights per package are $25).
Collect broken strip lights that are still in good condition and read the previous post to find
out how to reuse old strip lights. You'll be on your way to saving power and some real cash without sacrificing performance!
The additional bonus is that LEDs do not produce a significant amount of heat and you'll find that
a good thing especially during the warmer months.

Kyle
Kyle May
Ohio Cichlid Association
Northern Ohio, USA

Labari Sadar
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 4:43 pm

Re: LED Lighting Part Deux: Puck Lights -a cheaper option?

Post by Labari Sadar » Thu Jul 04, 2013 4:48 pm

Kyle May wrote:Cruising Lowe's Home Improvement store today I found LED Puck lights.
If you read the previous post, you saw my article on how
to change your current energy wasting strip lights to energy efficient LED lights.
I won't go into the how's and why's here, (go read the previous post for that), but for a moderate initial investment
you can save a ton of money in the long run by switching over to led lights.

In that article you were introduced to a 5 led light fixture that uses 7 watts.
While it will provide enough light for the standard 75 - 90 gallon 4' long tank, it also
costs about $55 for the fixture. The strength of that light is a series of 5- 1.5 watt LED lights spaced out
over the length of the fixture and this is a good thing for longer tanks. Still $55 can seem a lot of money to upgrade
an old strip light. Of course over the next couple of years this price will drop dramatically,
but for now it's about the cheapest fixture I'd found until today. As I mentioned before I found LED Puck lights
while cruising Lowe's this afternoon. The big deal here is that the puck lights come three to a pack for $25.
Here's a pic one of the puck lights:
This puck light has 6 leds behind a fresnel lens. These leds are supposed to use .5 watts each for a total of
3 watts, but in testing the puck light actually used 5 watts. I didn't do a long test on the fixture so it's possible that
after running for a longer period of time the consumption would decrease. Still, 5 watts is a tiny amount of power
considering that one of these puck lights completely lit a 36" x 18" 40 gallon breeder. Here's a pic of one puck light on a 40.
This tank is on a system by the way, so it is totally full of water in this pic but do pardon the dirty glass please:
I don't even have the puck in a fixture or centered on the tank and it's nicely lighting the aquarium. Sure there's
a tiny bit of light falloff in the corners, but I have long despised the flat lighting of florescent tubes.
I have 4 40 gallon breeders and all but one of them are currently lit by a 13 watt compact florescent bulb.
The puck light uses almost 2/3rds less juice than the energy miser compact florescent! By the way,
if you look at the instructions on the run of the mill compact florescent bulb, it'll tell you not to use
this type of bulb in humid areas..so the fish room probably is a bad choice for the compact anyway.

Consider this. I tested a light strip on a 20 gallon high aquarium recently. This was the type that had a starter.
This 24 inch light strip was using 53 watts. Just one puck light will light a 20 gallon tank like high
noon on a Tuesday in June....all while saving over 90% of the previous energy hogging strip light.
So now you can light tanks up to 40 gallon breeders with a single 5 watt puck light that will set you
back just over $8 each US, (3 puck lights per package are $25).
Collect broken strip lights that are still in good condition and read the previous post to find
out how to reuse old strip lights. You'll be on your way to saving power and some real cash without sacrificing performance!
The additional bonus is that LEDs do not produce a significant amount of heat and you'll find that
a good thing especially during the warmer months.

Kyle
Hei Kyle, I wanna buy some bcoz have got interest in this lights. Is it possible to decrease the price a bit little?

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