Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Discussion about cichlids from Lake Tanganyika

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Colby Dixon
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Colby Dixon » Wed Sep 19, 2007 4:52 am

Mine are getting bigger! Here's new pics:

Image'

Image

Image
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Colby Dixon
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Colby Dixon » Sat Sep 29, 2007 4:22 am

New Pics:

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Image

Image
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by sidguppy » Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:52 am

is that a homegrown baby Haplotaxodon?
it looks small......but very nice!

I got a question for you Haplotaxidermists out there: does this particular fish also occur at greather depths than the upper 10 meters as quoted in Konings book?
"And he piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the rage and hate felt by his whole race. If his chest had been a cannon, he would have shot his heart upon it"
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Colby Dixon » Sun Jan 13, 2008 4:42 pm

Thanks Sid,

My pics are all of supposedly wild caught fish (I'd be shocked if someone was commercially breeding them) brought into my local fish store through Atlantis. Yes, they are still fairly small ~5 inches long. I have some new(er) pictures of them, but since I moved them into a bigger tank without the Cyprichromis school, they have become quite shy. I do appear to have a Male/Female pair. I am hoping to report good things about them once they get to adult size...
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by sidguppy » Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:24 am

hehe
the first pic of 3 in that last series threw me off....for some reason it looks tiny
but it's the same pictured elsewhere then

I got mine at a whoppin 3" and boy where they small.....gluttons though! now they're close to 8" and looking massive.
i have 6. they always stay together.
strangely only 1 sometimes shows a mating pattern in wich he turns yellowish without bands and a black head.
the other 5 all have bands when he does.....a lone male? or a dominant male? the bodyshape is exactly the same.
i did spot them turning around in circles in a flat sand pit a few times.

are yours easy on the food? mine behave like gluttonous koi-carps. i swear if i toss in breadcrumbs, they'll eat it......

if you can get a few more, do! they're far more a shoaling fish than Cyps in the aquarium; they always stay together, even when doing the circle dance.
;-)
"And he piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the rage and hate felt by his whole race. If his chest had been a cannon, he would have shot his heart upon it"
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by sidguppy » Fri Jan 18, 2008 1:48 pm

I'm not nearly as handy with a camera as most of you people but I managed to snap
Image
one of my Haplotaxodon trifasciatus

the pic is misleading; this lil' beastie is a whoppin' 8" and eats like a carp. and there's 5 more in the same tank.
when I toss in floating food you get these slurping slobbering noises more associated with a tank full of Tilapia's
:lol:
"And he piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the rage and hate felt by his whole race. If his chest had been a cannon, he would have shot his heart upon it"
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Thomas Andersen » Sun Jan 20, 2008 11:54 am

sidguppy wrote:I got a question for you Haplotaxidermists out there: does this particular fish also occur at greather depths than the upper 10 meters as quoted in Konings book?
As far as I remember (I haven't checked) Poll list the maximum depth as being 30-50 meters, with an average depth of app. 10 meters. Coulter reports Haplotaxodon way deeper though, occuring down to 80-100 meters of depth (this one I checked :wink: )

All the best, Thomas

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by sidguppy » Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:45 am

thanks a lot, Thomas!

this means that in my tank they sure can stay (i would hate to ditch them), as it is turning into a collection of fish from the depths.

I'm currently in the process of selling the Labeo cylindricus and the petrochromis famula.

that leaves me with Babthybates, Haplotaxodon, Synodontis granulosus and Caecomastacembelus moori (wich Evert saw while diving at 40 meters wich is plenty "deep water" enough for me :lol: )

I'm looking for Neolamprologus prochilus and a nice Limnochromine as company for these. anmd more Bathy's (same species).

Gijs (dhonti) has been snapping at my tank (he's a LOT better at taking pix than I am) so more pics of Haplotaxodon will be posted.
I hope to see more spawning-like behaviour; the Haplotaxodons sure will be happy to see both Petro's and Labeo's go.
those aren't not exactly damaging them, but the chasings and the harassment isn't that good.

tells me only that Haplotaxodon is one heck of a thoughy and very very low on demands to keep.
strange that it's not more popular; the friendly character and the ease in accepting flake, the growth and the moderate size (not 2 feet or so, but a mere 10") should make em very popular.
they stay much smaller than frontosa's......makes em perfect for medum/large sized tanks. a 500L tank with plenty open space can hold a nice group if it's not crammed with rocks.
"And he piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the rage and hate felt by his whole race. If his chest had been a cannon, he would have shot his heart upon it"
Jean-Luc Picard

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Fazi64 » Mon Jan 21, 2008 2:06 pm

sidguppy wrote:....the friendly character and the ease in accepting flake, the growth and the moderate size (not 2 feet or so, but a mere 10") should make em very popular....
Hi,
I am very surprised :o . Are they really so peacefull? They look much more grave they are in fact :!:
Chris

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by sidguppy » Mon Jan 21, 2008 4:02 pm

yes they are

their character is like Xenotilapia ornatipinnis or Blue Neon females or something, only far less twitchy. not as easily stressed

a very placid fish.

I've seen Ophtalmotilapia's and Cyprichromis microlepidotus half their size boss them around.

better comparisons in agression (better: lack of it) are Gnathochromis or Limnochromis. again, the milder ones.

the headshape is misleading. yes, it's fairly obvious a piscivore. but in my experience it's the piscivores that are often very mellow!
people confuse a carnivorous piscivore nature with agression. but it's not agressive behaviour when 1 fish eats a smaller one. just predatory. I see the same lowkey behaviour from my Bathybates. another very laidback fish. another more wellknown laidback carnivore is Altolamprologus. and a lot of big Malawian Haps.

the worst agressive offenders I've known in cichlidae are often omnivore or even worse: herbivore aufwuchsfeeders. now there's some vicious nippery fishes! Tropheus, Petrochromis, Malawian Mbuna's, Neetroplus from Central America etc etc. a single halfgrown Tropheus has more concentrated character in 1 go than a dozen mature Haplotaxodons.
"And he piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the rage and hate felt by his whole race. If his chest had been a cannon, he would have shot his heart upon it"
Jean-Luc Picard

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Thomas Andersen » Wed Jan 23, 2008 2:41 am

Yes, Haplotaxodon are very fascinating fishes. Actually I've just joined the Haploholics, as I got a group of 13 H. trifasciatus some weeks ago. I'll see if I can get some shots of them.

All the best; Thomas

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Ammavita » Wed Jan 30, 2008 5:05 pm

Please Thomas, do fast :wink:

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Thomas Andersen » Thu Jan 31, 2008 2:41 am

I will, but I need to clean the front glass first :lol:

All the best, Thomas

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Ammavita » Thu Jan 31, 2008 3:23 pm

Try with an old credit card, it goes well :D :wink:

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by timus » Sun Feb 03, 2008 1:37 pm

Hii!

Did somebody of you already propagate them in the captivity?

Marcin.T <')))><

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Ammavita » Sun Feb 03, 2008 4:05 pm

I believe that is never arrive yet in captivity :cry: :wink:

Regards,

Fred

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Colby Dixon » Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:42 pm

Update:

Well, I've moved the two Haplotaxodon trifasciatus over to a larger tank. http://www.cichlidforums.com/showthread.php?t=26678

~The tank is currently stocked with 3 Altolamprologus compressiceps (1F 2M), 1 "Tanganyikan Banded Eel" Mastacembelus plagiostoma, 4 Neolamprologus leleupi and one Synodontis decorus.

~Filtration is 1 Emperor 400, Penguin Biowheel 350 and a DIY powerhead/sponge combo.

~I use Seachem "Tanganyika Buffer" and "Rift Lake Cichlid Salts" per manufacturer's instructions.

~Temperature is a fairly constant 78.5F.

It does appear that I have a male and female. The larger fish is much stockier and bulky while its caudal fin extensions are much smaller and less pronounced than the smaller fish's. The smaller fish is skinnier and has extremely pronounced extensions on his fins. The two fish can usually be seen swimming together.

Recently, I needed to dispose of an adult group of approximately 20 Gambusia affinis ('skeeter fish). I put the group in just before "lights out", thinking they would (mostly) still be there in the morning...

...only two dead bodies, and one live fish (which both soon disappeared) were left in the morning!

Image

Image

Image
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Ammavita » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:03 am

Hi Colby,

Thanks for sharing this observation and those nice pics.
Did you observe a change of behavior after feeding them with Gambusia affinis?

Regards,

Fred

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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Colby Dixon » Sun Mar 16, 2008 12:50 pm

Ammavita wrote: Did you observe a change of behavior after feeding them with Gambusia affinis?
Fred,

No, neither I nor my wife noticed any real change in behavior.
I'm not an aquatic biologist...I just play one on the internet.
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Re: Haplotaxodon trifasciatus information thread

Post by Colby Dixon » Sat Apr 26, 2008 7:46 pm

More Pics!

Image

Image

Image

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I'm not an aquatic biologist...I just play one on the internet.
-CD-AKA-Seedy

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