What are the Willem Heijns guidelines?

Discussion about cichlids from Central America
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Willem Heijns
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Re: What are the Willem Heijns guidelines?

Post by Willem Heijns » Mon Aug 27, 2012 10:59 am

@Don: you couldn't be more right. We will never be able to give our fish exactly the same habitat as they occupy in the wild. So the real issue is: how much difference with that natural habitat do we consider acceptable? That's why I said "as close to their natural habitat as possible". Where it all boils down to is the real reason why we keep cichlids (or any pet) in the first place. It's for our own enjoyment of course, but the well-being of our fish could (and should) enhance our joy and should therefore be an objective in cichlid keeping.
One remark Don: let's not focus on size alone (or too much). Behavioral aspects are just as important. And maybe more difficult to appreciate.

@Lee: What would be the difference between wild caught and captive bred cichlids? So far I have never seen a "domesticated" cichlid, being easier to keep than its wild counterpart. Which reminds me of my compelling question (see my earlier post) . Anymore comments on that?
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Re: What are the Willem Heijns guidelines?

Post by Don Hiatt » Mon Aug 27, 2012 12:01 pm

Dan Woodland wrote:
Lee Nuttall wrote:When we talk about space, behavior and feeding requirements does this also apply to captive raised fish, as many points in Don's post are referring to wild caught specimens. Is there an distinction between the two??

I believe it is important to make this distinction when keeping either wild caught or aquarium raised specimens. I would think that space and feeding requirements at least maybe different when giving guidelines for wild caught fish??
Good question, I don't think there should be Lee. I think both should be treated as they were removed from a natural or wild environment or at a minimum their wild counterparts environmental needs provided. Look at dogs as an example (more people can relate to dogs than fish), no matter if it's raised in your back yard or in the wild it's needs are/should be looked at the same.

A friend has a wolf, yes a 100% wolf, he has it caged up in his back yard. It paces constantly and looks like it's stressed ALL THE TIME!! It's a hard thing to watch as it trys to climb the fence to escape and franticly paces back and forth when it can't. I know dogs are supposed to be more intelligent than fish but that should not matter - I liken his situation to that of our fish captives. As a matter of fact we call our fish "captive bred" which to me intimates they belong in nature not our tanks. No I'm not an advocate of turning all our captive animals/fish loose but we should provide the best most responsible care we can for them.

As Willem's first and second system designs show some animals, fish (dovii) in this discussion, should not be caged/kept at all while others deserve a shot at having a normal/natural existence. Dan
Dan,
I agree that both wild and captive bred fish can pretty much be treated in the same matter. Even though they have been born and raised in captivity, they are not domesticated.

Lee,
When I was referring to fish in the wild, I was pointing to what their actual physical and nutritional needs are, not that the particular fish in questions was bred in captivity or not. I was hinting at the fact that a species that eats mostly Cichlids in the wild may not be getting it's nutritional needs met in captivity and the captive setting if present would be far from what the fish would want to be subjected to.

That said, there a plenitude of animals that lend themselves well to captivity.

Dan's reference to the caged wolf brings to mind a leopard I saw at a local zoo. Same thing. The animal was pacing back and forth, back and forth. Not only did it look unhappy, it looked pissed and ready to do something about it if given the chance.

Pacing is a way animals in captivity deal with being confined to an unnatural setting.

This is the same type of behavior can be seen in isolated Cichlids that constantly move the substrate in their tanks.

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Re: What are the Willem Heijns guidelines?

Post by bennymoreno51 » Fri May 08, 2015 8:11 pm

Some cichlid are harder to breed in captivity that why I kept tank like the lake my african cichlid to I has big rock in it

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Re: What are the Willem Heijns guidelines?

Post by bennymoreno51 » Fri May 08, 2015 8:32 pm

Hear is a few name of fish that are starting to find there in home tank rock bass fish sea bass fish not many but some about rock bass some folk when out there to catch them and put in there in renember these fish get big

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