Fishing on Campus (Photos)

Discussion about cichlids from Central America
Modest_Man
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Fishing on Campus (Photos)

Post by Modest_Man » Fri Mar 17, 2006 1:04 am

Went out with my trusty K-mart pole and some 2lb test to see what I could catch. Ended up with 15 fish in an hour. 1 large male convict, 2 male jags (6-8"), 3 female jags (6"), and 9 red devils (all less than or equal to 6"). Bait of choice...bread. I used a bobber with 2' of leader and a small weight 6" from my size 15 hook. Like shooting fish in a barrel. Didn't have my camera on me, but here is the one guy I kept. I was really trying for some 5 star generals, guess they don't like bread. :angry: I'm assuming all the red devils are mixed, but they all had some nice large lips, which I expertly missed in my photos.

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Best I can do right now....


Went out again...brought the camera.

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The Pond
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Generic red devil, musta caught 15 or so today.
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5 star general. I caught 4-5 and kept the smallest, most colorful one (Not the one pictured).
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Nice male convict, caught 4 males and one female.
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Bucket O' Cichlid. Can you count them all? This was after 20 minutes or so...
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A very stressed jag in the corner...
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This lil' fella is already swimming around and showing good color.

Ended up letting them all go but a small jag and 5 star. The jag has a screwed up mouth, I can't tell if it's from the hook or natural.

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rickson
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Post by rickson » Fri Mar 17, 2006 1:54 am

great pic 8)

Paulo José Alves
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Post by Paulo José Alves » Fri Mar 17, 2006 5:07 am

Hi


Interesting. "Isn´t the "five star general" a H. fasciatus? By the way, where is this, Florida?
All The Best
Paulo José

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Post by Bas Pels » Fri Mar 17, 2006 5:21 am

Paulo José Alves wrote: By the way, where is this, Florida?
Was wondering the same. Beautiful citrinellum/labiatus (citriatus??) though

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Post by MacFish » Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:32 am

Paulo José Alves wrote:Hi


Interesting. "Isn´t the "five star general" a H. fasciatus? By the way, where is this, Florida?
Kinda looks like a female H. Elongatus. I couldn't find a good picture of H. fasciatus though. He is in Hawaii.

http://www.tangledupincichlids.com/imag ... s.pair.jpg
Last edited by MacFish on Fri Mar 17, 2006 8:05 am, edited 2 times in total.

Don Hiatt
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Post by Don Hiatt » Fri Mar 17, 2006 7:43 am

You have it made. lol.

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Post by Dan Woodland » Fri Mar 17, 2006 8:55 am

Huh? Didn't realize there were cichlids loose in Hawaii! What else is there? Dan

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Post by Don Hiatt » Fri Mar 17, 2006 10:37 am

Yes, there are many cichlids loose in Hawaii. There were introductions of Tilapia and Cichla for fishing. I also know of introductions of Jaguar Cichlids too. From what I have read, many of the introduced species didn't take to the environments and they were unable to establish themselves. I do belive there is a Cichla fishery to this day.

On a side note: Jacksons Chameleons are taking over in Hawaii. Many of these animals end up in the pet trade.

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Lisachromis
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Post by Lisachromis » Fri Mar 17, 2006 10:43 am

http://www.hawaii.edu/environment/H1IntroFish.html (a few only on here)



List of Freshwater Fishes for Hawaii (USA)

Scientific Name Common Name Status
Amphilophus citrinellus Midas cichlid introduced
Amphilophus labiatus Red devil introduced
Aplocheilus lineatus Striped panchax introduced
Archocentrus nigrofasciatus Convict cichlid introduced
Archocentrus spilurus Blue-eye cichlid introduced
Astronotus ocellatus Oscar introduced
Carassius auratus auratus Goldfish introduced
Channa striata Snakehead introduced
Cichla ocellaris Peacock cichlid introduced
Clarias fuscus Whitespotted clarias introduced
Colossoma macropomum Tambaqui introduced
Corydoras aeneus Bronze corydoras introduced
Cyprinus carpio carpio Common carp introduced
Dorosoma petenense Threadfin shad introduced
Fundulus heteroclitus heteroclitus Mummichog introduced
Gambusia affinis Mosquitofish introduced
Hemichromis bimaculatus Jewelfish introduced
Hemichromis elongatus Banded jewel cichlid introduced
Hemichromis fasciatus Banded jewelfish introduced
Ictalurus punctatus Channel catfish introduced
Kuhlia sandvicensis Hawaiian flagtail endemic
Lentipes concolor O'opu hi'u kole endemic
Lepomis cyanellus Green sunfish introduced
Lepomis macrochirus Bluegill sunfish introduced
Leporinus fasciatus Banded leporinus introduced
Limia vittata Cuban limia introduced
Liposarcus multiradiatus Sailfin catfish introduced
Melanochromis johannii Bluegray mbuna introduced
Micropterus dolomieui Smallmouth bass introduced
Micropterus salmoides Largemouth bass introduced
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus Oriental weatherfish introduced
Monopterus albus Swamp eel introduced
Oncorhynchus mykiss Rainbow trout introduced
Oreochromis macrochir macrochir Longfin tilapia introduced
Oreochromis mossambicus Mozambique tilapia introduced
Oryzias latipes Japanese rice fish introduced
Parachromis managuensis Guapote tigre introduced
Pelvicachromis pulcher Krib introduced
Poecilia latipinna Sailfin molly introduced
Poecilia mexicana Shortfin molly introduced
Poecilia reticulata Guppy introduced
Poecilia sphenops Molly introduced
Puntius filamentosus Blackspot barb introduced
Puntius semifasciolatus Chinese barb introduced
Sarotherodon melanotheron melanotheron Blackchin tilapia introduced
Gobiidae Stenogobius hawaiiensis O'opu naniha endemic
Thorichthys meeki Firemouth cichlid introduced
Tilapia rendalli Redbreast tilapia introduced
Tilapia zillii Redbelly tilapia introduced
Xenentodon cancila Freshwater garfish introduced
Xiphophorus helleri Green swordtail introduced
Xiphophorus maculatus Southern platyfish introduced
Xiphophorus variatus Variable platyfish introduced

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Post by Don Hiatt » Fri Mar 17, 2006 11:08 am

Wow Lisachromis,
That is impressive and depressing at the same time.

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Post by Modest_Man » Fri Mar 17, 2006 4:35 pm

Heh. Yeah, I'm located in Hawii. If you want to see some impressive photos check this link out http://www.hawaiibassfishing.com/defaul ... 9726&id=24
Yes, there are many cichlids loose in Hawaii. There were introductions of Tilapia and Cichla for fishing. I also know of introductions of Jaguar Cichlids too. From what I have read, many of the introduced species didn't take to the environments and they were unable to establish themselves. I do belive there is a Cichla fishery to this day.

On a side note: Jacksons Chameleons are taking over in Hawaii. Many of these animals end up in the pet trade.
Tilapia are definately the main fish. There are millions of them in all the streams, canals, and even in pure salt water at the marina. Plecos are everywhere too, in the streams at least. By "Cichla fishery" I think you're referring to the Wilson Resivoir. The link above has info all about it.

These are the guys I've either seen personally in the wild or caught with a net/pole. :roll:

Amphilophus citrinellus Midas cichlid introduced
Amphilophus labiatus Red devil introduced
Archocentrus nigrofasciatus Convict cichlid introduced
Astronotus ocellatus Oscar introduced
Carassius auratus auratus Goldfish introduced
Cyprinus carpio carpio Common carp introduced
Gambusia affinis Mosquitofish introduced
Hemichromis elongatus Banded jewel cichlid introduced
Hemichromis fasciatus Banded jewelfish introduced
Liposarcus multiradiatus Sailfin catfish introduced
Melanochromis johannii Bluegray mbuna introduced
Oreochromis mossambicus Mozambique tilapia introduced
Parachromis managuensis Guapote tigre introduced
Poecilia reticulata Guppy introduced
Poecilia sphenops Molly introduced
Tilapia rendalli Redbreast tilapia introduced
Xiphophorus maculatus Southern platyfish introduced

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Post by seveland » Fri Mar 17, 2006 11:51 pm

wooahh! check out the size of this "red devil"

Image

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Post by Modest_Man » Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:23 am

Image
I like this guy personally. They "identified" it as a Convict.

Anyone wanna try to explain differences identifying hemichromis elongatus, hemichromis fasciatus, hemichromis frempongi? Or at least tell me what ones I caught? I thought they were elongatus.

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Post by Paulo José Alves » Sat Mar 18, 2006 4:48 am

Hi

We should remember that Haway has very few freshwater fish species ( 5?) leaving lots of ecological niches vacant. So the ecological balance is not that disturbed, all these fish species came to create a new biological structure and not exactly to destroy what didn´t exist.
All The Best
Paulo José

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Post by Modest_Man » Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:56 pm

I really don't see why the amount of species matters...introduced alien species have decimated the native populations, no matter what size. It's not just fish, there are endemic insects, mollusks, and crustaceans that use the waterways. These guys are found no where else in the world. Once they're gone they're gone for good.

There are five species of native stream fish (four gobies and an eleotrid). Four of these are endemic and one is indigenous. Native stream shellfish, all of which are endemic, consists of two crustaceans and three mollusks.

Hawai'i streams are also home to the larval forms (nymphs) of dragonflies and damselflies. Both have members that are endemic to Hawai'i.

The waterways consist of plecos and talipia. Not really an even distribution of niches. The plecos have even caused erosion problems due to their habbit of destroying aquatic plants and digging into banks. (Though I'm sure us humans do much more damage ourselves.)

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Post by Paulo José Alves » Mon Mar 20, 2006 8:55 am

Hi


The introduction of alien species has allways some kind of impact, negative many times. However the spread of alien species by man is on going process that exists since man exists, having been intensified in the last decades, and to a certain degree it can´t be reversed. Anyway we live in a world of change, and not forgeting the impact on the native aquatic hawains I suspect that most people likes to have fish, beautiful ones preferably, in the water ways.
All The Best
Paulo José

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Post by Don Hiatt » Mon Mar 20, 2006 9:11 am

Another thing to remember is this. There are native freshwater species in Hawaii. They may be related to saltwater species, but there are some endemics.

By the way. That "convict" looks like a red devil to me.

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Post by Paulo José Alves » Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:18 am

Hi

I agree that the "convict" seems very much to be a morph of A. Labiatus/citrinellum.
All The Best
Paulo José

Modest_Man
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Post by Modest_Man » Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:03 pm

Na, I guarantee 100% convict. He's just a big mature male. I'm going out again in an hour or so, I'll take more shots.

As a side note, a pair of smaller convicts I netted layed eggs last night. Striped male, pink female. They ate the eggs though. Oh well, it was their first time.

Here's a shot of a similar convict at Mojo's board.

http://forum.aquamojo.com/index.php?sho ... hl=convict

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Post by MacFish » Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:11 pm

I think they are refering to this "convict" not the one you caught...

Image

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