Photos of X. sp. red princess in its natural habitat

A place to discuss the wonderful assemblage of lake Tanganyika cichlids from the tribe Ectodini, like Callochromis, Xenotilapia, Enantiopus, Cyathopharynx and Ophthalmotilapia!

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Photos of X. sp. red princess in its natural habitat

Post by Thomas Andersen » Tue Dec 27, 2005 3:37 pm

I´m very proud to present the first pictures of Xenotilapia sp. "red princess" in its natural habitat, thanks to Evert van Ammelrooy who has photographed this beauty at the bottom of Chituta Bay, Zambia - thank you so much Evert, for letting me use these pictures :)

The red princess is a sheer beauty in the aquarium, but I think it looks even more stunning in its natural habitat :shock:

All pictures © Evert van Ammelrooy

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cyatide
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Post by cyatide » Tue Dec 27, 2005 4:10 pm

:shock: :shock: :shock:

Thank you very much Evert and Thomas for sharing those fantastic photos!!!

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Post by BlackDeep » Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:22 am

Wow, fantastic pictures :shock: :shock: !
Thanks.

bye
Florian

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Post by Clayn » Wed Dec 28, 2005 6:34 am

Thanks to both of you for sharing.
Lake Tanganyika.....So many fish....So little time

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Post by liuchin » Wed Dec 28, 2005 6:45 am

These pictures are really wonderful. Thanks for sharing.

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Post by Mark Smith » Wed Dec 28, 2005 6:18 pm

Hello Thomas and Evert

Thanks, Thomas, for sharing the latest photos from Evert! You have really aroused my curiosity now.....Evert, may I ask you what other interesting species of cichlids, or non-cichlids, did you see and or photograph at 50 meters depth??? Any additional photos you wish to share??

Keep up the awesome photography work and efforts!!

Mark

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Post by Thomas Andersen » Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:00 am

Yes, it is really fantastic what Evert has achieved – I was almost trembling down my chair when I first saw the pictures of the red princess :D

I’ve tried to persuade Evert to attending the forum, but I don’t think he has registered, but I’ll give it another try

Mark: No, the red princess is by no means the only exiting fish Evert has discovered and photographed – have you seen this one http://www.cichlidae.info/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=944 ?

Evert is scanning his dias-pictures at the moment, and I’m sure there are a lot of surprises to come, but here are some of them – note that not all pictures are photographed in Chituta Bay, but various places in the depth of Zambian waters

All pictures © Evert van Ammelrooy

Gnathochromis permaxillaris

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Greenwoodochromis spp.

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A new Neolamprologus spp. ??

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A new Greenwoodochromis spp. ??

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Triglachromis otostigma

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At first glance this one looks as a Reganochromis calliurus, but both Evert and I are not so sure that it actually is - I´ve been speculating if this indeed could be the elusive Baileychromis centropomoides (apparantly one of the rarest Tanganyika cichlids and only known from Zambian waters, but never observed or photographed alive before) whose shape resembles that of R. calliurus - unfortunatly the dorsal fin is laying down, so it can´t be seen if the first spines are elongated as they should be in B. centropomoides

Image

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Post by Livio Leoni » Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:13 am

Dear Thomas
this year a scientific article has been published about vision of Cichlids. One of the Cichlids of the article is Baileychromis centropomoides. I know also that Christian Sturmbauer collected Baileychromis but he didn't take a photo!!! :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Livio

Xenos wrote:
At first glance this one looks as a Reganochromis calliurus, but both Evert and I are not so sure that it actually is - I´ve been speculating if this indeed could be the elusive Baileychromis centropomoides (apparantly one of the rarest Tanganyika cichlids and only known from Zambian waters, but never observed or photographed alive before) whose shape resembles that of R. calliurus - unfortunatly the dorsal fin is laying down, so it can´t be seen if the first spines are elongated as they should be in B. centropomoides

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Post by joseff » Thu Dec 29, 2005 6:03 am

Hey Thomas,

I also think it is B. centropomoides. Don't you think the slope of the fore head on that fish seems a bit elongated...more than a Reganochromis calliurus. :D

It might just be me... :?

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Post by Mark Smith » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:11 am

Hi Thomas

Thanks so much for the great shots of more deepwater Tanganyikan cichlids!! Very tantilizing to say the least!

I think the first photo of what is being callled Greenwoodochromis sp. is actually either Limnochromis abeelei or staneri.

That new Neolamprologus is very nice, and it reminds me of the species found in the same area that has gone by the trade name of Red Dorsal or Ventralis Chituta. The new Neolamprologus is more slender with more outstanding coloration than the latter, though.

Lastly, as much as I would love to see and drool over a photo of Baileychromis centropomoides, the last photos is R. calliurus. In B. centropomoides, the lower jaw extends out a little beyond the upper lip (jaw).

Also, in the original description of B. centropomoides, it states that when the soft dorsal and anal fins are depressed, they extend just beyond the anal fin origin. Also, regarding the caudal fin, the lower lobe is rounded while the upper lobe is pointed and longer. Also, the underside of the head, snout and breast of B. centropomoides is extremely broad and flattened.

Thanks again for making these amazing photos available for us all to enjoy!!

Mark

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Post by cyatide » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:18 am

Again, congratulation on these pics!

I've been surfing the net for years, but this is the most interesting thread I've ever found on a Cichlids-forum!

I don't think the fish on the last Evert's pic is a Reganochromis calliurus, the rear part of the dorsal fin seems completely different.

This is a R. calliurus of my friend Michael Näf:
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Thanks again Evert for sharing!

Paolo

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Post by Mark Smith » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:24 am

Hi Paolo

Great shot of R. calliurus, thanks for putting it up for us to see. In the originial description of B. centropomoides, it shows a completely clear, patternless anal fin. In the photo submitted by Thomas, it shows some coloring on the anal fin. Also, the photo shows the characteristic horizontal mother of pearl striping seen in R. calliurus. B. centropomoides has no such striping, at least according to the original description.

Hope this helps.
Mark

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Post by Philippe Burnel » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:46 am

This kind of pic is really useless to give a correct name to the fish (even if I think it's R. calliurus).
It's not always easy to give a good name to a fish with a very nice picture, so with this kind of pic... I'll never try ....

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Post by Thomas Andersen » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:58 am

Hi Livio, Joseff, Mark, Paolo & Philippe

I had a feeling that the last picture would bring some discussion, and so it did :wink: - great!

Yes, the Neolamprologus indeed resemble the "ventralis red line", but as you also said Mark, this one is quite stunning!

The reason that I say Greenwoodochromis on the first pic is that Limnochromis spp. has a smooth round head profile and the depicted cichlid seems to have a bend in front of the eyes, but maybe it’s the angle that’s confusing me - you’re properly right :wink: :)

All the best,

Thomas

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Post by Mark Smith » Thu Dec 29, 2005 11:52 am

Thomas

Either way, I love seeing such interesting photos. I hope we will be able to see more of the deepwater shots!

I just sent you an answer on your X. longsipinnis query.


Mark

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Post by Mark Smith » Sun Jan 01, 2006 10:40 pm

Hi Thomas

My mouth is still salivating over the last photos posted. Are there anymore we can marvel at soon????

Mark

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Post by Thomas Andersen » Mon Jan 02, 2006 5:20 am

Hi Mark,

I hope so - I´m as curious to see what´s hidden in the deep as you are! :D

Evert has just registred a couple of days ago, so hopefully he will soon come by and join the discussions - I guess you all have lots of question for him :)

Here is a few more pictures Evert has send to me - all pictures © Evert van Ammelrooy

A beautiful pair of Lepidiolamprologus kendalli:

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What´s this? The same fish as we discussed above?

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Post by Mark Smith » Mon Jan 02, 2006 10:54 am

The last photo looks like, possibly, a sub-adult/juvenile R. calliurus. If not, then possibly a new species of Reganochromis. Just a hunch, though.

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Post by tanganyikadiver » Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:51 am

hello,

the last fish was no more then 5-6 cm and there were more of them. the problem was that everytime we would put a light on them they would hide in the litte holes made in the mud (same as l. signatus does).

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Post by tanganyikadiver » Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:57 am

hello,

sorry i totally forgot to introduce myself.
my name is evert and have now been to the lake six times. and every time i went for a month to dive, dive and dive.

made now over 250 dives at the lake and hours of snorkling too. went all over the coast from moliro/chipimbi to kasanga (tanzania).

i hope and know we will have lots of intresting discussions as i often have with thomas.

greetings,
evert van ammelrooy

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