Cold tolerance among cichlids

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Martin Tversted
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Cold tolerance among cichlids

Post by Martin Tversted » Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:32 am

Hello all
I have not contributed to this excellent site before, but I have been lurking for a while.
I am an aquarist from Denmark, Scandinavia. My main work is among the mexican goodeids, but I also work with various other familys of fish, all of them rather cold tolerant fish. My fishroom maintains temperatures betwin 12 and 17C in winter (some gymnos are kept below 10C), and warmer summer temps. This allows me to work with livebearers, anabantoids, catfish, killifish and cichlids.
So far my focus haver mainly been on species from southern Brazil down to Argentina. Generas like Cichlasoma and Gymnogeophagus and soon I hope to work also with the southern species of "Geophagus" and Crenicichla. Even with rather mild summers here I can also keep some species outside in ponds during the summer. This gives an excellent opportunity to view their behaviour under seminaturel conditions. And they thrive well outside.
Anyway, the reason for me to start up this topic is to get more knowledge about the species of cichlids that experience cooler periods in the wild.

I could imagin that some species of North African species/Middle East takes relative cool winters, (and hot summers). Anyone working with species from that area, preferrable with data about their collection?

Other suggestions?

Martin

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mauriciodelamaza
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Post by mauriciodelamaza » Sun Jan 01, 2006 7:43 pm

:) Hello Martin,

How about North American? Some North American cichlids of the Herichtys genus are relatively cold tolerant, although I think that keeping them in aquariums at 17 C is already pushing (any) cichlids to their extreme limits.

Cichlid-inhabited-North-Estern-Mexico experiences winter temperatures that fluctuate between -8 (in some extreme years) and 25 degrees Celcius. However it must be remember that the temperature-buffering- capacity of water is tremendous, and I do not think that the main water bodies in the region experience temperatures below 15 C at any given time.......and those areas that do, have thermal fed sections which present a winter sanctuary for the species to survive.

As to cichlids in other parts of the world, my guess is that they present similar scenarios.

Cheers

Mauricio

Don Hiatt
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Post by Don Hiatt » Tue Jan 03, 2006 9:18 am

From my own experiance, I have seen Aequidens Sp Silversaum in Peru in water that was in the 50's. The river they were in was a stream fed by the Andes. I even saw a single fish with babies.

Many Tilapia from Northern Africa appear to be fairly cold tollerant. The cichlid species found in the middle east (Isreal, Jordan and Syria) are subjected to cold spells at certain times of the year.

Dan Woodland published in TFH that he found Crenicichla breeding in water that was in the 50's in Argentina.

Martin Tversted,
I once kept a group of Hericthys cyannoguttam in an outside pond for a whole summer. When I brought them in that fall, their colours were vibrant. I have read that many aquarium fish do well if kept outside, even for short periods of time.

Martin Tversted
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Post by Martin Tversted » Fri Jan 06, 2006 4:50 am

Yes, the fish colours are much better when exposed to true sunshine and a better diet.
New Jersey would probably have decent summers for many fish to live outside. I actual just got some Gambusias from New Jersey, maybe they can thrive well in my pond here (very very isolated)
Did you manage to get some of these Aequidens sp. Silbersaum back home to the states?

Martin

Don Hiatt
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Post by Don Hiatt » Fri Jan 06, 2006 6:29 am

I only caught two cichlids while I was in Peru. I would have had to pay too much to ship just two fish. I left them with my inlaws (My wife is from Peru) and plan on shipping them and some other fish when I go back in May. I have pictures of the habitat I found them in, but all the pics I took of the cichlids didn't come out. I did get a couple shots of a large tetra, but it didn't come out too clear either. That's what I get for forgetting to bring my own cameras. lol.

carlos martins
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Post by carlos martins » Fri Jan 06, 2006 5:54 pm

Here in Portugal, we have "chanchitos" cichlasoma facetum. They are wonderful, but not so peaceful cichlids. they live freely in nature in South of Portugal (some rivers in Alentejo). these cichlids were introduced in the wild in 1940 +-, this fishes were released for control of pest aquatic insects.
The low temperatures in winter are near 0ºC and the water about 6ºC, they breed in spring with the water temperatures arround 14-18ºC
Image

sebastian00
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Post by sebastian00 » Mon Dec 11, 2006 8:06 am

hi all i was wondering which american cichlid can live in cold water ,such as the "chanchito" cichlid , and which is most tolerant to low water temperature
I JUST LOVE AMERICAN CICHLIDS ,THEY JUST RULE

Paulo José Alves
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Post by Paulo José Alves » Mon Dec 11, 2006 9:11 am

Hi


Just to correct some data given by my countryman, the average temperature in south portugal in winter is mediterranean type, so temperatures above 10ºC are the norm during daytime, lower at night and dawn, below 5ºC are uncommon. The photo presented is of a "C." octofasciatum not of a Australoherus facetum. This last species is seen with fry in summer.
All The Best
Paulo José

Bas Pels
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Post by Bas Pels » Mon Dec 11, 2006 9:27 am

Looking at the map, southern South America will be the farthest from the equator on aerth where cichlid naturaly can be found.

Therefore, these fish will be the most cold-resistant cichlidds, although great hights, might alterthis somewhat

day and night averages below 10 C do happen there, yearly, but averages under 8 C are rare.

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Lisachromis
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Post by Lisachromis » Mon Dec 11, 2006 9:34 am

Paulo José Alves wrote:Hi
The photo presented is of a "C." octofasciatum not of a Australoherus facetum. This last species is seen with fry in summer.
I believe that photo is Carlos' sig photo. 8)

Dan Woodland
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Post by Dan Woodland » Mon Dec 11, 2006 12:57 pm

As Don mentioned I've seen Cichlids in very cool water, Crenicichla vitatta in Esteros del Ibera, Argentina , in the upper 50's and other more central to Mexico in mid 60's to low 70's.

In one of my experiences, when returning home from a collecting trip, I had Central American Cichlids, Nandopsis beani, get to near freezing and survive to breed! No Ich no trouble at all.

Central Americans are tough. Some of my lower tanks, at the moment, are in the upper 60's and the fish are spawning!

After a few trips to Central America I began keeping my fish much lower in temperatures than the prescribed 78-80 degrees taught in old-school fish keeping. Water has more O2, uneaten food does not rot as fast, aggression is down and feeding requirements are reduced but spawning is still evident.

I hope this helps.

Dan

P.S. Just yesterday I found a .75” Amphilophus chancho fry in a tank with 1” of unheated unfiltered water. He must have jumped from the neighboring tank because I never fed it and it had to be in there about a month because that tank had not been set up because I was soaking some items to clean. He was in perfect shape! Cichlids are tougher than you think!

Paulo José Alves
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Post by Paulo José Alves » Tue Dec 12, 2006 4:43 am

Dear Dan woodland


Your reference of Esteros de Iberá is very interesting to me because that is a dream place for me, I would love to go there to catch fish. I supose you were there in the austral winter, what species of fish did you capture and see and what legal procedures did you have to go through to be able to capture fish and take them out of the country?
All The Best
Paulo José

Dan Woodland
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Post by Dan Woodland » Tue Dec 12, 2006 12:32 pm

The Esteros is a beautiful place. It's a water plane much like the Llanos. We saw tons of fish including huge schools of leperinus, catfishes, sting rays including a 6 foot diameter Potamotrygon brachyuran http://images.google.com/images?as_q=&s ... afe=images, C.. vitatta, dorado, samonios (spelling), and more!


We could not collect in this area as it is a nature preserve. I didn' mind because it was such a beautiful place, I know I repeated my self, with all tons of water fowl, hawks, and fishing eagles!

We did collect in other areas of Argentina, mainly Corrientis/Resistencia. For that we had a wholesaler in Buenos Aires help us with collection and shipping paperwork. As a matter of fact we were detailed overnight one evening by a police Captain in the field because he did not believe our papers were real! We had asked for directions to a camp ground when he said why, we told him and it all went down hill from there.

Dan

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