Introuction and a few questions

Discussion on general cichlid care and issues. ID cichlids you don't know the origin of. Mixed tank questions.

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charmed74k
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Introuction and a few questions

Post by charmed74k » Mon May 09, 2005 5:53 pm

Hi, i am new to this forum but not to Chiclids. I had a Thirty gallon tank with several for 2 years, but i didnt know what types i had bought. It was my first Chiclid tank and i was and still am a bit unschooled. I also had a twenty gal on with one jack dempsy in it due to the fact he couldnt get along with my other fish. His name was Buttie and his tank was in our bedroom and he had a bad habit of picking up rocks and dropping them (tink...tink...tink...tink...) all night long. We would wake up the next morning with all the gravel on one side of the tank, and the next morning it would all be moved to the other side of the tank, lol. This lasted for months untill i decided to see what would happen if i moved the rocks back every night before bed. He kept doing it, but now with more fever. It became a game and we got so used to the noise that when he died we couldnt sleep well without the tink...tink.. He was almost 4 inches long when he died and had changed color so many times that we lost count. This fish was the fish that made me realize my love for Chiclids. Who knew fish could have such distinct personalities. I am an animals lover and have two siamses cats (Jasmine & Bliss), a Shi-tzu dog (Maj, short for her majesty), a 4 ft Ball python that is still growing rapidly(named Porthos, we named her before we found out she was female), and Tiger Salamander (Dino), and two siamese fighting fish (Dartanian, and Sebastian), all whome are mine and my husbands children, lol. I have come across a "almost giving it away" deal on a 100 gallon tank with stand, both custom made. It was formally used as a saltwater tank which I intend to convert into a freshwater tank. I know i can clean it up with saltwater and vinager with no harm to the future fish, but i want to be sure of what i want before i put my new fish in thier home. My thirty gallon i had didnt have such a good ending. one of the Jack dempseys had babies and i think the daddy killed ALL of the other fish (even the ones bigger than himself) protecting his babies. So i ended up with a tank full of dempseys. I would like any advice on how to keep that from happening this time, lol. I tried putting them into a breeder net, but i couldnt catch the little buggers. And the daddy fish was literally charging at my net and i was afraid he would hurt himself. Little did i know he would kill all of my other fish off in two days time.
Anyway, here is my hopes for my new tank.... I want a big selection of colorful Chiclids. I would like to have about 25 or more fish but i know they can get big, so as many as i can and still get a variety. I like unusual fish that catch your eye, and odd balls like frogs and shrimp although i know most of them proboly wouldnt survive in a Chiclid tank, so i would like to know what kinds of other life i can put in there as well. I like the Black jacknife fish also but am uncertain wether they would be comaptable. I want to get ones that get along rather well and am willing to buy more than one of each kind if that helps. I have heard that black gravel brings out thier color. Does anyone know this to be true? I want my tank to be a healthy, happy home for them and a beautiful eyecatching creation for myself and husband. I plan to buy new filters and equiptment for the tank as well. Any advice on what kinds of fish to research and think about to buy, and any info on ohter aqatic life i can add as well, and how many fish i can have in the tank, and so on would be very appriciated. Thanks for reading! :wink:
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charmed74k
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Oops, forgot to mention

Post by charmed74k » Mon May 09, 2005 6:20 pm

I forgot to mention i live in a small town in Mississippi and would like some advice on where to find some good sellers. I do have a local pet shop here, and the owner seems to know what she is doing.... but i plan to ask her if she can get the types i want and if she cant were should i go to? I live an hour away from Jackson MS, our state capitol and they have a big selection of fish shops, but how do i know a good store? Any advice on this?
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Lisachromis
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Post by Lisachromis » Mon May 09, 2005 9:00 pm

Wow, what a start! You know, you might be best seeing what sorts of cichlids appeal to you first. After you've picked at least a general area, we can help you with specific ideas. A good spot for looking at some nice photos is: http://www.cichlidae.info/gallery/

I would suggest you look at Lake Malawi or Lake Tanganyika in the African section first. :)

charmed74k
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Thank you :)

Post by charmed74k » Mon May 09, 2005 10:33 pm

Thank you , i would love to look at the pictures. I will reply to this post again after i decide, but i was already leaning to the african cichlids. They seem to have more colors and varieties.
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Ok, here goes

Post by charmed74k » Tue May 10, 2005 1:47 am

:lol: So many to choose from. Now keep in mind i dont know anything about any of these, lol. But here is the list of ones i liked by looks. But i also want ones known for thier personalities and not too aggressive. Ok, here goes: The ones i like best are followed by a **
Altolamprologus: calvus
Anaomalochromis: thomasi
Astatotilapia: sp.44, nubila
Aulonocara: stuart granti, sp.chitade masinje, ethelwynnae, aulonocara
Benitochromis: riomuniensis, tricoti**
Caprichromis: liemi
Chromidotilapia: boulenger
Copadichromis: azureus**, jacksoni or ilesi, mbenjii
Cyphotilapia: frontosa** I want at least one of the bump on the head ones if i can get away with it.
Haplochromis: sp flameback, sp kenya gold
Hemichromis: cristatus
Julidochromis: marlieri**, regani**
Labidochromis: caeruleus (white)**, sp. hongi **
Melanochromis: johannii
Metriaclima: aurora**, cyneusm**, estherae**, zebra chilumba**
Melanochromis: interruptus**
Ophthalmotilapia: boops**, ventralis**
Neolamprologus: brichardi (albino also)**, christyi**, pulcher**, leleupi, helianthus**, sexfasciatus**, niger**, similis**, tretocephalus**
Pundamilia: nyererei**
Pseudotropheus: demasoni**, elongatus**, pulpican**, socolofi**, sp. zebra long pelvic hara** (stunning fish!), sp polit lions cove**, tursiops**
Tropheus: brichardi (either msalaba, kipili, or kabimba or all three variations)**, duboisi (maswa and/or ubira)**, sp black (any variety)**
Xenotilapia: sima**



Whew! Now keep in mind i dont want all of these, lol. I just wanted to give you a big enough selection for you to choose from because i know some of these would be to big, and some to aggressive, and some not community tank material. But these are the ones i like color wise. Which of these would go well together and have interesting personalities and are hardy, and fairly easy to get in the southern US and not "too" costly a peice? Since i will be buying a good many i cant pay more then up to ten dollors a peice. Also i heard you need to put them all in at the same time because if you introduce any new ones after the tank has established, it can cause territorial problems... is this so? Thats another reason of price issues, if i have to buy them all at one time, it can add up fast. My hubby is a nurse but, they dont pay nurses that well in the south, lol. I still plan to buy a book, but any advice would be very much appriciated. thanks so much for your time:)
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Lisachromis
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Post by Lisachromis » Tue May 10, 2005 9:44 am

Wow, you sure went looking quick!

You've picked out a pretty decent selection of fish. I would tend to tell you to keep away from the featherfins (the Ophthalmotilapia species) with most of the other fish you've picked since they don't tend to stay "in colour" as much and are actually quite easily damaged by some of the fish you've picked. Some of those fish may be hard for you to find as well. Your best bet is to see if there is a local fish club around for you to contact. Generally speaking, you can often get good deals on fry from other members. A good selection to start with may be some of the Haplochromis, a Labidochromis species (caeruleus is fairly common and easy to get), and maybe one or two of the Pseudotropheus sp (include Metriaclima here as that's the new name). May I offer a suggestion of Pseudotropheus saulosi. That's a species in which male and females look very different from each other but both are very pretty in colours.

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Post by MatsP » Tue May 10, 2005 11:23 am

As to "Other life" you can put in the tank, I would think that a Synodontis species from the same region as your choice of cichlids, for example lake Malawi or Lake Tanganyika.

Obviously, for the size of tank you're looking at (I guess about 4-5 foot long and about 20-24 inches height/width), you can keep most of the Synodontis species.

They are Catfish, and come in a number of different varieties, from small to large.

If you're not planning to breed your Cichlids, Synodontis Multipunctatus "Cuckoo catfish" shouldn't be impossible to get hold of. But they have a peculiar breeding behaviour in that they lay their eggs together with mouthbrooding cichlids, and the cichlid becomes involuntary surrogate mother, where the Syno fry eats the eggs/fry of the cichlid.

Synodontis Petricola is another Tanganyika specie that isn't a "Cuckoo breeder", so it will not interfer with any cichlids breeding (other than trying to eat the fry, but so will the other cichlids, so there's no big difference there...).

Synodontis Njasse is the only one that is native to Lake Malawi.

There are also riverine Synodontis. These aren't suitable for the rather high pH and hard water that you want to have with the Rift lake cichlids.

You can find a comprehensive list of Synodontis species on Planet Catfish, here.

Bear in mind that some of these fish are more common than others, so checking with a local/mail order supplier or http://www.aquabid.com for availability before you get too enchanted by "Synodontis Unobtanium". Also, there are czech breeders that cross syno's into hybrid species. This is not a very nice thing to do, and it's advisable that you make sure that you get what you are actually asking for, rather than some "frankenfish" created by injecting hormones into the fish. here's a guide on how to tell the "fake" from the "real".

A good occupant for any tank is a good algae-eating fish. There are several different varieties. My favourite is the Ancistrus "Bristlenose Pleco" family. They are very tolerant to a wide variety of water conditions, as long as it's got a decent supply of food and oxygen in the water, it's going to be fine. If you plan on having really hard water in your Cichlid tank (and your local water isn't particularly hard), you should probably acclimatise it by keeping it in a small temporary tank for a while, gradually adding water of the same kind as the cichlid tank. Planet Catfish has a description of the "Common" varietey here. As long as your one isn't tiny (they grow to about 5-6 inches), it should be able to fend for itself in your cichlid tank. If you keep more than one (of different sex of course), they may well end up spawning too, and if you have lots of cracks and crevices, some fry will eventually end up big enough to survive on their own.

"Common Bristlenose" shouldn't be particularly hard to find or expensive either, generally about $5-10 per fish. If you have a local fish shop that is just a tad better than Walmart, they should be able to get a couple of them in if they haven't got them already. Or you could look at http://www.aquabid.com for them.

I don't think frogs and newts will go well in this sort of tank.

There's obviously a whole heap of other fish that could go with your cichlids. These are just a few suggestions that "make sense to me".

Oh, and by the way, it's ALWAYS a good idea to stick to a local shop if you have one that is good, because they DO tend to be useful in emergencies. If you don't use your local for anything but the emergency, they aren't going to survive. Most shops have a wholesaler that has a much bigger stock than the average local shop. So it's worth asking for things. Bear in mind also that some species have a season when they are available, and if they aren't on the wholesalers list, it may be because they aren't possible to catch at the time of the year you're asking (most South american species are caught during dry season, because it's near impossible to get to them during rainy season, for instace).

This doesn't mean that you can't "cheat" on the odd occasion when you've decided to go to "big town" at some point or another, and just impulse buy something because it's available... [Just make sure you know what you're buying and know what size it grows to, etc.]

Enough ramblin'... ;-)

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Mats

charmed74k
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Thanks!

Post by charmed74k » Tue May 10, 2005 5:33 pm

Thank you both so much. That sounds like great advice. Lisachromis, you gave me many types to research and think about, i thank you for the time you put into the post and for your brainpower, lol. I plan to still buy a book this weekend on Ciclhids, so i can have at hand pictures and advice, but i also have printed your advice to take to my pet dealer. That way she can help me pick out what she can get. She is the owner of the local pet shop where i got my Ball python, and over time we have come to realize that she knows a lot about them and has been extremely helpful. So maybe she has the same affinity for Chiclids. She does keep a few in her store now and again, but always sells out very fast. I plan to special order my fish so i can pick what i want and not just get leftovers. But i do have some concernes about ordering from an online comapny. How can i ensure they will be shipped properly with as little stress as possible? The shipper that ships the fish to our local shop is very good, and they never leave his care from the moment thier shipped out. Im afraid if i ordered from online they may change hands more, which is a recipe for disaster,:). Also i live pretty far out in the styx, and to get something shipped here can be a pretty big challenge. But i know i would get a much better choice selection if i ordered online, so i am torn on the subject. I will look into the local fish club idea. As i said, our state capitol is an hours drive away from my town, and even though Mississippi is considered one of the lesser states, i should be able to find some other cichlid lovers through thier pets shops there.
Mats, thank you for your wonderful advice as well, and you are more then welcome to "ramble on" in answer to my post anytime :). I will look into all you sugested. I want an aray of life in my tank, but i also want a peacful tank. I cant help but look at the setting up of the tank as an art project because i am a artist at heart, but i also want the fish and other life to be as happy as they can be. So i strive to find as much information as i can so i can have both. I have a lot of research to do, lol, but i look forward to it. Any advice on a good book would be welcomed as well. I want to give my pet shop owner plenty of information so she knows exactly what i want. Thanks so muchf or your time guys!
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Post by Ken Boorman » Tue May 10, 2005 10:33 pm

Any advice on a good book would be welcomed as well.
Here are a couple of very good, general cichlid books to start with:
The Cichlid Aquarium (2nd Edition) by Paul Loiselle
Enjoying Cichlids (2nd Edition) by Ad Konings

Hope that helps,

Ken
A.N.G.F.A. North American Co-ordinator

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charmed74k
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:)

Post by charmed74k » Tue May 10, 2005 11:13 pm

Thanks for the reference! We got the tank today, and BOY is it big! It turned out to be a 150 Gallon tank instead of 100 gal like i thought. I guess i misunderstood him. But what a great misunderstanding and surprise, lol. Now i have a bigger canvas to work with and my future babies have a bigger home. He meant what he said when he said it was custom built. it isnt shaped like i thought it would be, and the stand is very nice and completely sturdy with nice shelves inside. The shape is not as long , but more tall than i first thought. Its a bit longer than a normal 100 gallon, but taller as well, so i guess thats where the other 50 gall went, lol. Wow, my mind is reeling about what i can do with 50 more gal space, lol. Anyone know a good online store to find good, reasonable, safe rocks and terrain, made for chiclids, for the tank ground? Ok, now to take on the project of cleaning the massive tank, whew, wish me luck guys :)
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A few more questions

Post by charmed74k » Wed May 11, 2005 3:55 am

Hi, you guys are gonna get tired of me, if your not already, lol. I just want to make sure i do right by soon to be babies. Ok, ive been doing a bit of research and have a few more questions. I have decided to breed them due to the fact i have learned that if there are only males they tend to fight more and be less peaceful (leave it to the females to keep things peacful, lol) and due to the fact it would give me more of a selection. And im sure my local pet shop wont mind taking the frye after they grow a bit. But now i have the delima of how to keep territorial and protective parents from killing my other fish off like my dempsey did. Would a breeder mini tank insert do, or should i invest in a small 3,5,or10 gallon tank to put frye in. Also, do i put the parents in with the fry? Now, i have read that some of the males hold the eggs in thier mouths, is this true? And if it is should i put them into another tank while thier in that stage?
Also i have read the term "ditherfish" in my research several times with no explanation. But what i have gathered is that they are fish that somehow keep the tank more peeceful, and i have read that giant danios are good for this. is this correct info? I still havnt decided wether i want Tanganyikans or Malawi cichlids yet, but i am leaning to the Tanganyikans because of them being less agressive, but then again i have heard the Malawi have more distinct personalities. Ohh, who can decide? lol Anyway I also have a question about tank introduction. I have heard many different things. I have heard that you need to introduce all the fish you want at one time to keep the territorial issue down. But i would think that would put the tank into "new tank syndrome" (which is another mystery to me which i am researching, lol). What about if i added a few every two weeks or so, but moved stuff around in the tank a bit, therefore making them all "new fish" again? Just an unschooled idea..... Also i have read that in feeding them, that meat products or anything that contains meat products can cause bloat, whats your opinions on that? Also i kept my old tank at about 8.5 and we already had naturally very hard water. Will this be suitable for the type of cichlids i am considering? And after some research, i have decided to stay away from the Cuckoos tankmates, lol. They are interesting, but i do want to breed with no major problems. I do ,however, like the Bristle-nose.
I am also getting a 20 gal just for a jack dempsy. I loved my other one so much and look forward to a new friendship with one, but he will get the whole tank to himself, lol. I learned my lesson the first time... ok, well thats all the questions for today, but i will warn you.. i have several more pages bookmarked to check out on the morrow, lol. Thanks for being patient with me :). You guys are great! :)
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Post by MatsP » Wed May 11, 2005 6:22 am

More ramblin' here...

New tank syndrom is what happens during the startup of a tank. The tank needs to have "good bacteria" built up in the filter (and on surfaces in the tank too), which break down some of the harmfull chemicals produced by the fish-waste. The fish produce ammonia as a result of breaking down proteins. In humans, we produce urea, which is ammonia bound to some carbon, which is disposed in the urine, but fish have a "simpler" approach, which means they dispose of the waste in form of ammonia through the gills.

Ammonia is severly poisonous and irritating to the fish, so you don't really want any of it to stay in the water. Fortunately, nature is "clever" enough to have produced some bacteria that can convert ammonia into nitrite (NO2). Nitrite is, however not much better. It prevents the fish from breathing. Again, nature comes to the rescue with a different kind of bacteria that converts the nitrite to nitrate (NO3). Lucky for us, nitrate is a few hundred times less harmfull to the fish than either ammonia or nitrite.

[Note: Nitrite sounds and spells very similar to nitrate, so it's worth taking care to figure out which is meant at any given time.]

New tank syndrome is the problem that occurs when you haven't got these good bacteria. which in turn leads to high levels of ammonia and/or nitrite. If you have a lot of fish in a new tank, the levels may well rise too high too quickly, and the fish become sick from the high levels.

The best approach to avoid this is to introduce a few hardy fish to start the tank up. This is called "maturing" or "cycling" the tank.

To check that your tank has matured, you can check the ammonia and nitrite levels (get a test-kit from your shop), and as long as you get any sort of "non-zero" reading (i.e. anything above the lowest value the test can show), you're not ready for more fish.

You don't HAVE to cycle the tank with the fish that you're planning to keep there later. So you could cycle the tank with gold-fish or platy's, whilst wanting to keep cichlids later. Just take those "cycling fish" out and place them somewhere else. Just as long as they are reasonably OK with the water quality you want for the "real" fish.

That's about it on "new tank syndrome".

I'll write another piece with some more answers later.

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Post by MatsP » Wed May 11, 2005 10:58 am

Ditherfish: A fish that "dithers about", not really going in any particular direction or with any particular purpose, but calms the other fish into "knowing" that there's no danger around. The other fish sees the dither fish out, and realize that the "coast is clear" when it comes to predators.

They can also divert attention from agressive fish, by entering the territory of some fish, and letting a poor neighbour off the hook for a while, when the aggressor chases the dither-fish away.

Giant danios are good for this, and they aren't particularly expensive either.

Another specie that goes well in a african cichlid tank would be certain types of rainbowfish, and MAY give you a bit more colour, but will also cost you about 2-3x the money.

Some species of barbs and tetras also match, but generally aren't happy with the high pH and hard water that are favourable for rift-lake cichlids.

The main criteria is that they are relatively alert fish, that are capable of outrunning (is there such a word as outswimming?) any of the aggressive occupants of the tank.

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Post by MatsP » Wed May 11, 2005 11:30 am

Feeding: Many of the rift lake cichlids are more herbivores (vegetable eaters) than carnivores (meat eaters), so they need a sufficient measure of fibres in the food to keep them happy. A mix of different foods is the best course here.

Of course, this is a generalisation, so you really need to know WHICH fish you're getting to decide exactly what food is best for those. And of course, there is the added problem of making sure fish A eats his vegetables rather than fish B's "meat" diet. Keeping fish that mostly eat the same thing helps here... Some fish are more sensitive to diet than others...

I don't actually know much about rift lake cichlids, so I can't talk about individual species and their food habits.

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Mats

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Post by MatsP » Wed May 11, 2005 11:35 am

Last one for today...
Introducing territorial fish to already territorial fish in a tank.

There's no easy solution for this one. The best advice is to re-arrange every piece of "furniture" in the tank, so that everyone has to re-claim their territory. This doesn't ALWAYS work, but it's working better than just dropping the fish into the tank and leaving them to fight for their own territory.

It's a good idea to start with the fish that is least aggressive about their territory, and go on to the ones that are more so. That helps the less aggressive find their "feet" (or fins?) first, and then get the more agressive to fight their battles to find a space.

But it's probably a good idea to introduce MOST of your fish all at once (after the tank has been cycled, of course). If they are all relatively small juvenals, they'll all grow bigger together (hopefully at about the same rate) and get along nicely that way.

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Mats

charmed74k
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back again :)

Post by charmed74k » Thu May 12, 2005 2:32 am

Now that my housework is done i can get back to what i love to do.. research and learn. Ok, I have been doing some figuring.. and was told that the basic rule of thumb is 2 inches of fish per gallon. I figure i need to add two extra inches due to the fact they will on average grow to about 4 inches. And i also need to consider that i need about 4 of each species so that they dont gang up on one another.. In a 150 gall tank....so .................................................................... I figure 4 devided into 150 is 37.5, so i will round it up to 38. Since i want 4 of each kind 4 devided into 38 is 9.5. Ok, so that means i could pick about 8 different kinds of fish and the left over 1.9 can be for the bristle nose catfish and a few danios (by the way, how many do i need for that size tank?), and a few snails. I hope you guys dont think me cruel, but i love the snails and the fact they clean the tank so well. I had them in my other cichlid tanks, but when they reproduce like crazy, i just put a small plate of carrots in the tank at night and they swarm to it. And in the early morning i take them out and take them to the pet store to give away. And this is the cruel part. I let my husband crush some of the baby snails because our pet shop lady says they are a delecacy for the fish. And they seemed to love them.... I just cant bring myself to do it myself :(. Anyway does all this sound about right on average for a 150 gal tank of african cichlids? I am trying to find out how many different types i can have so that i can pick some of the ones i like best out of the ones i picked. And then maybe it will help me decided if i want Tanganyikans, or Malawis. I also have a question about the black jack knife i was talking about earlier. Do you guys think i could have one with these type of cichlids? I plan to do some more research tonight, but i wont be back on for a few days. Its my husbands days off and i am always devoted to him during those days. But he goes back to work Sunday night, so i will be back then. Maybe this will give you guys a well deserved break from this one post, lol Boy my mind is reeling. There are so many choices and im not sure which ones cost more and which ones get to the size i want (from 2 to 4 inches), and i cant seem to find a easy to read comaprison list, lol. I have heard that the Tangs are less agressive and easier to raise as well as more colorful, but that the Malawis are more personality proned.. i cant make up my mind. Anyway, maybe i will know more when i come back on Sunday.. getting tired now.. Hope you guys have a good weekend :).
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Post by Lisachromis » Thu May 12, 2005 9:50 pm

Ok, first off... you really can't follow a "if a fish is this big, you can have this many in this size tank" sort of rule. Generally speaking, the larger a fish gets, the more MASS it acquires. It's the mass size that's more important in figuring out how many fish you can have in a tank. Some cichlids (I'm talking only Malawi and Tanganyika here for now) can easily reach a foot long! That's alot of biomass in a tank. There's no way you'll be sticking in that many fish in a 150 gallon tank. You pretty much have to figure out what species you want, and then work out how many fish from there.

I don't know what sort of fish a black jack knife is. That's the problem with common names. Sometimes different areas have a common name for a fish and they are two different fish. So, maybe you can try to find out what the scientific name of the fish is and we can help you out further there.

The snail thing is fine. In fact, it's a great supplement to the fishes diet. :)

I think you have the Lakes mixed up a bit. Malawi is more colourful and Tangs can be tougher to deal with (depends on species). For beginners, I'd probably suggest mostly Malawian cichlids, with maybe 1 or 2 of the easier species from Tang.

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Post by charmed74k » Sun May 22, 2005 1:17 am

Hi, i am back. Ive done a bit more research when ive had time in the past few days. I have fallen in love with Discus fish! But , alas.. i cant have them. My pet store owner has warned me that they are terribly hard to keep alive and that even she cant seem to keep them long enough to sell them. And she says that the few she has sold have not made it... maybe its her distributer... but anyway. I would love to have them, thay are very fascinating. But i have decided to take your advice and get the malawi cichlids. I will give you the demensions on the tank as soon as i can get my husband to help me measure it. I bought a few books (Cichlids , understanding angelfish, oscars,discus and others by David Alderton, and Tropical fishwater aquarium fish, from a to z by Schliewen). And i plan to buy more on Amazon.com. I found that my local book store didnt have much of a selection. I am going to try to find one that specializes in Malawi cichlids with good details and pictures. We didnt get much of a chance to work on the tank due to this weeks tragedy, but i plan to get back to it soon. I will get back to you guys soon, i still have more research to do.
Love your fish!

charmed74k
Posts: 16
Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 4:10 pm

finally!

Post by charmed74k » Sun May 22, 2005 3:41 am

I think i have finally made a decision on what typ of malawi cichlids i want, lol. I love the peacocks and haps. I have chosen the peacocks with a few select types of medium sized peaceful haps. I havnt chosen them all quite yet. But now i am trying to decided wether i want an all male tank or not. I want them to be happy and am not sure they would be with all males. But i read that if you keep females as well, you should only keep one type of peacock because of most of the females in the species being so close in bland color and look, and there is often cross breeding. I would really like more than one color so i am thinking of having an all male tank. And adding to this decision is the fact i am not very good at breeding anyway and have no experience. I really like the aulonocara species. I would like to add one of the Blue Dolphin cichlids (cyrtocara) , but am not sure wether it would go well with the aulonocara due to its size. But i have read they are very peaceful and can be mixed with them eaisily. What is your opinions on this? any more advice would be appriciated :)
Love your fish!

charmed74k
Posts: 16
Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 4:10 pm

ok, here goes

Post by charmed74k » Sun May 22, 2005 7:12 am

These are the fish i want "if" my pet lady can get them...3*'s are the ones i want most, 2*'s second most. I am adding a few so i can get your opinions on the best of the bunch. But this is the fish i have in mind. I am hoping the mix is a very colorful one as well as interesting in personalities. Thats why i chose to mix Peacocks with Haps. Any advice? Thanks so much for your time in reading and responding.


Aulonocaras:
Ethelwynnae (northern aulonocara)***
Hueseri (midnight peacock or white top peacock)***
Kandeense (blue orchid peacock)***
Koningsi (blue regal peacock)***
stuartgranti (german red & yellow regal)***
sp Yellow collar***
Baenschi (benga peacock or new yellow peacock)**
Korneliae (blue gold)**
Masoni (masons peacock)**
Maulana (bi-color 500)**
Rostratum (long nose peacock)**

Capadichromis:
Jacksoni***
sp midnight mloto***
sp mloto goldcrest***
sp mloto undu (ivory head)***
trewavasae (mloto likoma)***
Virginalis (fore crest mloto)***

Protomelas:
taeniolatus (super red empress)**
Spilonotus (tanzania Liuli royal)**

Otopharnx:
Lithobales (yellow blaze)**

Cyrtocara:
Moorii (blue dolphin) only one of these if possible to mix them :)
Love your fish!

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