a cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher

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Bojan Dolenc
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a cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher

Post by Bojan Dolenc » Sat May 15, 2010 5:33 am

A.L. Le Vin, B.K. Mable, K.E. Arnold (2010) - Kin recognition via phenotype matching in a cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher - Animal Behaviour - Volume 79, Issue 5, Pages 971-1180, e1-e4 (May 2010)
Abstract
Cooperatively breeding groups are often made up of a mixture of related and unrelated individuals. In such groups, being able to identify and differentially cooperate with relatives can bring indirect fitness benefits to helpers. We investigated the kin recognition abilities of the cooperatively breeding African cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher, while controlling for familiarity between individuals. When given a choice of associating with unfamiliar kin or unfamiliar nonkin, juvenile N. pulcher spent significantly longer associating with kin. Although both chemical and visual cues were required to stimulate the fish, chemical cues were more important than visual cues in kin recognition in this species. As all stimulus fish were reared separately from the focal fish, we can also conclude that N. pulcher used phenotype matching rather than familiarity to assess relatedness to other individuals. Furthermore, when given the choice of associating with familiar over unfamiliar kin, N. pulcher showed no significant preference. Hence, relatedness rather than familiarity appears to be more important in the association preferences of N. pulcher. This is advantageous, particularly if familiar individuals within the cooperatively breeding group are not necessarily relatives. In highly social species such as N. pulcher, being able to recognize kin can bring fitness advantages through kin selection and inbreeding avoidance.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00033472
Change in habit, producing change of function, is the main cause of the production of change in living structure. F. Wood Jones (1953) Trends of life

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Bojan Dolenc
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Re: a cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher

Post by Bojan Dolenc » Sat May 15, 2010 6:31 am

Roger Schürch and Dik Heg (2010) - Life history and behavioral type in the highly social cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher - Behavioral Ecology Advance Access published on March 17, 2010
Behav. Ecol. 2010 21: 588-598; doi:10.1093/beheco/arq024

Abstract

Many studies have found that seemingly unconnected behaviors are correlated into behavioral syndromes. These behavioral syndromes may be the consequence of interindividual variation in life-history strategies. Only few studies have investigated the role of behavioral syndromes in cooperatively breeding species, despite the fact that one would expect particular large variation in behavior due to the wealth of life-history decisions a cooperative breeder faces. In a longitudinal study, we repeatedly tested individuals of the cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher for exploration, boldness, and aggression and tested whether these behaviors were sex specific; whether they were interrelated; and whether they were connected to growth and to 2 major life-history decisions, helping, and dispersal. In both sexes, explorative behavior was correlated over time, even though after sexual maturity males increased their exploration rate. In both sexes, exploration, boldness, and aggression correlated when mature, and in females, helping behavior was part of the syndrome. No relationships with growth were detected. Helping and dispersal were related to each other in males, whereas females hardly dispersed. We suggest that the differences in the life histories between males and females (male dispersal vs. female philopatry) lead to the differences in behavioral types observed and also to the differences in the stability of the behavioral syndromes between the sexes. The links between dispersal and helping in males and the behavioral types and helping in females highlight the necessity to study multiple traits to understand the evolution and maintenance of variation in cooperative behavior.

Key words: behavioral syndrome, Cichlidae, cooperative breeding, life history, Neolamprologus pulcher, ontogeny.

Received 16 April 2009; revised 20 January 2010; accepted 3 February 2010.

http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/co ... t/21/3/588
Change in habit, producing change of function, is the main cause of the production of change in living structure. F. Wood Jones (1953) Trends of life

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Re: a cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher

Post by Mark Smith » Sat May 15, 2010 12:03 pm

Do the authors of this paper refer to what we have called N. brichardi as N. pulcher?

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Bojan Dolenc
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Re: a cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher

Post by Bojan Dolenc » Sat May 15, 2010 1:58 pm

Mark Smith wrote:Do the authors of this paper refer to what we have called N. brichardi as N. pulcher?
Probably. Scientific literature use for last 2 or 3 years the name "Neolamprologus pulcher groups" for the fish, previosuly called N. brichardi: for example look at the journal "Proceedings of the Royal Society" or "Journal of Fish Biology" (look at: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 2/abstract).
Key references: Duftner, N, KM Sefc, S Koblmüller, W Salzburger, M Taborsky & C Sturmbauer (2007): Parallel evolution of facial stripe patterns in the Neolamprologus brichardi/pulcher species complex endemic to Lake Tanganyika. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45, pp. 706–715.
http://www.kfunigraz.ac.at/zoowww/perso ... chardi.pdf
"It has been recently determined that The Fairy Cichlid or Brichardi is likely the same fish as the Daffodil Cichlid!"
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Change in habit, producing change of function, is the main cause of the production of change in living structure. F. Wood Jones (1953) Trends of life

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