Wet Dry Systems

Discussion about cichlid tank filtration

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Bassetdad
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Wet Dry Systems

Post by Bassetdad » Mon Mar 12, 2007 7:28 am

Hi Everbody,

I need some advice & on setting up my 220 gallon aquarium.
I am refinishing the basement in my house; I am going to flush mount the face of aquarium into the wall so only the front of the aquarium is exposed. When the tank is fully operational, it will house various cichlids. With this large of a tank, I was told that I would need numinous canister filters operating in a series or a wet dry system. My two current questions for my fellow members is….

1) What size wet / dry filtration system do you recommend for a 220 gallon aquarium?

2) What brand do you recommend me purchasing?

Thanks in advance for all of your suggestions

Bassetdad

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The More People I Meet, The More I Enjoy My Basset Hounds.

Dan Woodland
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Post by Dan Woodland » Mon Mar 12, 2007 8:36 am

Size needed will be determined by the wet/dry filter its self, meaning what capacity the manufacturer says their filter will handle. The Marineland Tidepool is nice and there are numerous smaller manufacturers.

Bassetdad
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Canister or Wet Dry?

Post by Bassetdad » Mon Mar 12, 2007 12:50 pm

Would I be better off purchasing a large canaister filter such as the Fluval FX5 instead of a wet dry sysystem for a 220 gallon tank?
The More People I Meet, The More I Enjoy My Basset Hounds.

Dan Woodland
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Post by Dan Woodland » Mon Mar 12, 2007 1:46 pm

Well that depends on what you're after. Both will filter the tank as needed.

The wet/dry may be noisy (this can be fixed by a number of methods)

You may have an evaporation concern depending on your environment.

With a wet dry you can add chemicals and a heater in the sump saving money from your big fish trashing the heater.

You’ll have to find a place to house the wet/dry.

The canister will be harder to clean; the filter pads are easily accessible in the wet/dry.

I think the big thing is the size of tank and how many times your filter choice can turn over the water volume. I like to stay around 4 to 1. In your case I’d use 800 Gallons per hour, maybe two Emperor 400 bio wheel filters.

Dan

Kevin Cumberton
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Post by Kevin Cumberton » Mon Mar 12, 2007 6:32 pm

In my 220gallon I use:

(2) Hagen AquaClear 110 Power Filters
(1) Amiricle Maxi-Reef 400 Wet/Dry Trickle Filter
(1) Supreme Mag-Drive Mag 9 waterpump.
(1) Hang-On-Back Overflow


The Aquaclears I toss all the fancy media and just use 2 sponge blocks. Once a week I sqeeze them out clean.

The Maxi-Reef Has a pre-filter pad on the drip plate. Again I squeeze that out each week.

I have a sponge pre-filter on the Mag 9 as well. @ 4' head and (2) 90* elbows

I like the HOB overflows because they take up way less interior tank space. The height is also adjustable. Mine is rated at 1000gph. Meaning it can take on that much I have it taking only about 700gph.

Maintenance is soooo easy with this setup. I use this combo on all of my tanks larger that 75gallons. Just with a smaller model wet/dry filter.

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apistomaster
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Post by apistomaster » Sat Mar 17, 2007 2:50 pm

I like using both wet/dry and canister filters combined on my large tanks.

I went DIY wet/dry on my Heckel Discus tank which is only 75 gallons plus another 25 in the sump at normal operating level.
The wet/dry has 2cu. ft. of BioBale media and the system is driven by a MagDrive 9.5, rated at 950gph @0' head. I have 3.5 ft of head includes two 90degree elbows to form the U-shaped return. The overflow is the add-on type with a AquaLifter pump to prevent siphon break when I make water changes or in case there is a temporary power outage.

In addition to the wet/dry I have an Eheim Classic #2217.

This system would easily handle a larger tank with larger messier fish than discus but I have ten Discus in what is a small tank by most standards. The return flow has two outlets. One in-line T ~3 inches below the waterline and a 90 degree elbow at the return pipe terminus ~18 inches below the water line.

I think that a higher than four tank volumes per hour is desireable. My system, not counting the Eheim is closer to 8 volumes per hour.
There is a nice current but divided the way it is the discus are not bothered by it. I also have a MaxiJet 600 powerhead driven sponge filter inside the tank on the opposite end from the main return. This opposing flow causes much water circulation that due to some cancellation effects, actually results in a relative large and calm "interference" zone which the discus prefer.

I have already previously grown ten Turquoise out to breeding pairs so it has a good history of suitability for discus. It has been in operation for over three years.

The back half of the bottom has a three inch high glass/silicone pllanter box where I have the plants and the front half is bare except a sprinkling of fine gravel to somewhat conceal the bare glass and makes it an easy place for the discus to leisurely forage for food.

Approximately 75% of the water is changed twice a week.
Larry Waybright

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