Genera list

Herichthys


Herichthys bartoni
bartoni

Herichthys carpintis
carpintis

Herichthys cyanoguttatus
cyanoguttatus

Herichthys deppii
deppii

Herichthys labridens
labridens

Herichthys minckleyi
minckleyi

Herichthys pame
pame

Herichthys pantostictus
pantostictus

Herichthys steindachneri
steindachneri

Herichthys tamasopoensis
tamasopoensis

Herichthys tepehua
tepehua

The Cichlid Room Companion

Sub-family
Cichlinae

Tribe
Heroini

Genus
Herichthys

Status
valid


Curator

Published:

Last updated on:
16-Feb-2012

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Herichthys cyanoguttatus Baird & Girard, 1854


Versions Polski

Original description as Herichthys cyanoguttatus:

  • Baird, Spencer F & C.F. Girard. 1854. "Descriptions of new species of fishes collected in Texas, New Mexico and Sonora, by Mr. John H. Clark, on the U. S. and Mexican Boundary Survey, and in Texas by Capt. Stewart Van Vliet, U. S. A". Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. (n. 7); pp. 24-29 (crc00256)

Synonyms (2):

  • Heros pavonaceus Garman, 1881, with type locality at Spring near Monclova, Coahuila, Mexico. Determiner: Miller, 1976.
  • Parapetenia cyanostigma Hernández Rolón, 1990, with type locality at Playa Bruja, Tequesquitengo, Morelos, Mexico. Determiner: Reis, 2003.

Conservation: Herichthys cyanoguttatus is evaluated by the international union for the conservation of nature in the iucn red list of threatened species as (LC) least concern (2013). Although H. cyanoguttatus is not considered under any kind of special protection, having a very large distribution range, some of the areas where it is found are subject to several environmental pressures. Rivers in northern Mexico are diverted for irrigation purposes, and exotic species, potentially competitive, like species of Tilapia and Oreochromis, have been widely introduced. An isolated population in the springs at la Mota park in the Ocampo valley in Coahuila state, dried up in recent years due to over exploitation of the water resources, an increasing risk for many populations in this every day more populated and dry area of Mexico.