Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Discussion about cichlids from Lake Malawi

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Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby jlose » Tue Mar 06, 2012 2:35 pm

I just received nine of this speces today. They're all about an inch and a quarter. I was wondering at what size do the males start coloring up? How many of you agree with the genus name changing from Melanochromis to Pseudotropheus? I've been keeping mbuna for 30 years and still can't get use to the constant genus changes. :-?
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Re: Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby CGILucidDreams » Thu Mar 08, 2012 5:05 am

Hi jlose,

First of all, you have a adequate number of those wonderful fishes.
Coloring up with "Maingano" starts very early, but some things must be taken in considerations.
First keep in mind that both males and females have the same coloration, and they should have their body pattern already.
The key to have good coloration with this fish is in food selection and good lighting condition.
For nice blue color, combine Spirulina based food along with regular food for Malawi omnivores, in order to get that blue shade.
For lighting, use any chosen light source that amplifies blue.
Without proper food and lighting, Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos tend to be rather white with dark-blue stripes.
Post some photos here, we would like to see your fishes.
Peter
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Re: Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby Pete B » Sun Mar 25, 2012 4:09 pm

jlose wrote:How many of you agree with the genus name changing from Melanochromis to Pseudotropheus? I've been keeping mbuna for 30 years and still can't get use to the constant genus changes. :-?


It doesn't matter if we agree or not with the name changes, it's not done for the benefit of the hobbyist.
The more biologists study these fish, the more knowledge is gained.
Species which were originally placed in one genus, are found to be more closely related to another, so are placed within that genus.

By using the scientific name, anyone, no matter what nationality, can communicate regarding the same fish.

I still see fish in retailers tanks with names that changed over 10 years ago. :?

If we use the "common" name confusion can arise, for instance when mbuna keepers talk about "yellow labs" the fish in question is Labidochromis caeruleus, but to others it could mean Hericthys labridens.

In the retail trade, manufacturers change product names, but it doesn't take long for everyone to start using them.
Why is it any different for fish?
.
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Re: Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby kupa » Tue Aug 28, 2012 5:15 am

Pete B wrote:
jlose wrote:How many of you agree with the genus name changing from Melanochromis to Pseudotropheus? I've been keeping mbuna for 30 years and still can't get use to the constant genus changes. :-?


It doesn't matter if we agree or not with the name changes, it's not done for the benefit of the hobbyist.
The more biologists study these fish, the more knowledge is gained.
Species which were originally placed in one genus, are found to be more closely related to another, so are placed within that genus.

By using the scientific name, anyone, no matter what nationality, can communicate regarding the same fish.

I still see fish in retailers tanks with names that changed over 10 years ago. :?

If we use the "common" name confusion can arise, for instance when mbuna keepers talk about "yellow labs" the fish in question is Labidochromis caeruleus, but to others it could mean Hericthys labridens.

In the retail trade, manufacturers change product names, but it doesn't take long for everyone to start using them.
Why is it any different for fish?
.


Hm im confused :shock:
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Re: Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby Lisachromis » Tue Aug 28, 2012 9:04 am

What's confusing?

Maybe it's easier to say that we all understand what fish we're talking about when we use scientific names instead of common names since common names are often only good for a local region and are not world wide.

It would be nice if retailers kept up but many don't bother since they are sold the fish under 'old' scientific names by wholesalers.
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Re: Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby dogofwar » Tue Aug 28, 2012 9:24 am

...or many species are dumped into a single tank of "assorted Africans"... :?

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Re: Pseudotropheus cyaneorhabdos

Postby Philippe Burnel » Tue Aug 28, 2012 10:56 am

jlose wrote:I j How many of you agree with the genus name changing from Melanochromis to Pseudotropheus?


and it'll certainly change again as Pseudotropheus doesn't fit with the johanini group.
Anyway,, and even if it's not really scientific, the best is to use "Pseudotropheus" (between quotes) or expseudotropheus for database which don't accept quotes, like CRC catalog


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