Aulonocara mamalela "Lemon Jake."

Q&A About Lake Malawi Cichlids

Moderator: Pam Chin

Aulonocara mamalela "Lemon Jake."

Postby Pam Chin » Mon Dec 01, 2003 2:50 pm

Dear Pam,

I would like to work with Aulonocara mamalela "Lemon Jake." I have a few questions I hope you don't mind answering.

    What do you feed them when they are first born and what do you feed them now that they are an inch or bigger?
    What size tank do you breed them in?
    What ratio of males to females do you use in your breeding set up?
    How do you decorate the breeding tank? Do you use gravel or bare bottom? Do you use flower pots or shelters other then rock arrangements?
    Do you use lights. If so does it matter how long the lights are on?
    How big do the get?
    I have Pseudotropheus saulosi, could fry from these two species be raised together?

I want to be successful and I have not been able to find very much on breeding or keeping Aulonocara species.

Thanks, Jack
Last edited by Pam Chin on Mon Dec 01, 2003 2:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Aulonocara mamalela "Lemon Jake."

Postby Pam Chin » Mon Dec 01, 2003 2:52 pm

Dear Jack,

My finmate Gary is an Aulonocara freak! He is totally addicted to Peacocks, and Aulonocara "mamalela Lemon Jake" is one of his favorites. It is believed to be a color morph of Aulonocara Jacobfreibergi, and this complex is filled with some of the most sought after strains. Such as A. Jacobfreibergi "Otter Point," "Carolae," "Reginae," "Cape Kaiser," "Hongi Island," to name a few. Their fins are longer and they display them beautifully. It is easy to understand why they are called the "Malawian Butterflies." I like to feed the fry freshly hatched brine shrimp. It is their mainstay from the time they are free swimming to about 3/4 of an inch. Then I start feeding them spirulina sticks, they love picking on them. I continue to keep them on green sticks and flakes throughout adulthood.

I have a breeding group in a 60 gallon flat, with about 20 females and 3 to 4 males. This tank has a bare bottom and I am using sponge filters. There are a couple bundles of PVC at each end, and that is about it. There is definitely a dominate male, but I have observed subdominant males spawning with the females. Although they mostly live in large caves in the wild, I don't feel that it is necessary to duplicate, in order to get them to breed. Often hobbyists provide a layer of sand on the bare bottom tanks, I think it is easier to keep clean without the sand. Lighting is a big debate, all though I don't know how important it is. I have lighting over the tank, however it is only on when we are in the fish house. Some hobbyists do have lights that go on and off at certain times, but I am not that organized.

They get up to about 4-1/2 to 5 inches in length for the males, the females are a bit smaller 3-1/2 to 4". The females remain battleship gray, while the males display bright yellow fins with a blue body. I don't like to mix species unless I am totally out of room. Lately that has been the case, and Gary has had to mix all kinds of Mbuna fry with his Peacock fry. They do okay, but they just can't get enough food when housed with Mbuna. So, I would say only if you have to. The "Lemon Jake" is truly one of the most attractive Peacocks, just keep your water clean, and a diet of green flake and sticks. It will only be a matter of time before nature takes its course.
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